Parenting

Why has parenthood become so intensive, demanding and expensive?

Why has parenthood become so intensive, demanding and expensive?

Opinion: Overparenting is likely to rise as the 21st century digital economy advances

Parenting has become much more time-consuming, emotionally demanding, and expensive over the past few decades. Concerned with ensuring the academic success and development of their children, middle-class mothers in particular are often heavily involved in their children’s schooling and in other aspects of their lives. This involves engaging in long conversations with them, taking them to and from a wide range of extracurricular activities, and advocating on their behalf.

Studies such as Growing up in Ireland and Family rhythms in an Irish context confirm a growing pattern of child-rearing behaviors known as ‘concerted culture‘. It is a style of parenting designed to nurture children’s talents and equip them with specific dispositions and social-emotional skills that are valued in schools and by future employers.

We need your consent to load this content rte-playerWe use rte-player to manage additional content which may place cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please check their details and accept them to load the content.Manage preferences

From RTÉ Radio 1’s Today With Claire Byrne, parenting advice from clinical child psychologist Dr David Coleman

Despite growing concerns about the disadvantages of over-parenting for adults and children, especially for those with competing demands or limited financial means, intensive parenting as an ideal is likely to accelerate as the he digital economy of the 21st century is progressing. Why has there been such a marked cultural shift towards more time-consuming and emotionally-absorbing styles of parenting? In light of the pressures and complexities of intensive parenting, is it time to rethink society’s expectations of what it means to be a good parent?

The intensification of parenting has largely coincided with scientific discoveries about the human brain and child development emanating from the fields of neuroscience, behavioral economics, and developmental psychology. These define early childhood in particular as a period of intense vulnerability and parents as the determining force of the fate of their children in life.

We need your consent to load this content rte-playerWe use rte-player to manage additional content which may place cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please check their details and accept them to load the content.Manage preferences

From RTÉ Radio 1’s Drivetime, which fights are worth having with your kids?

Informed by this intellectual Holy Trinity, parenting “experts” are spreading a particular view of what it means to be a good parent, which raises the bar for parenting and fuels parental anxiety about to do things well. Meanwhile, the media’s fascination with stories of ‘stranger danger’ and the shrinking of public spaces has meant the end of informal, unsupervised games. This has largely been replaced by structured, adult-led activities to optimize children’s development and equip them with skills such as teamwork, courage and the ability to perform in public that are valued in schools and on work place.

Threats to the safety and well-being of children associated with their use of digital media is another factor that has contributed to making raising children increasingly difficult. Many parents report feeling the need to be both hyper-vigilant and ever-present in case something goes wrong when their child navigates the world of social media.

Parenting in the digital age requires tough conversations about screen time, internet use, cyberbullying and misinformation, which require sophisticated media literacy, negotiation and communication skills. In addition, digital technologies such as smartphones allow parents to be in constant contact with their children. Apps like ClassDojo giving parents unprecedented access to their children’s school life by sharing photos, videos and messages throughout the school day.

We need your consent to load this YouTube contentWe use YouTube to manage additional content which may place cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please check their details and accept them to load the content.Manage preferences

From ClassDojo, an introduction to the platform

But the most influential factors that contribute to the pressures and complexities of modern parenting stem from the social and political transformations wrought by globalization and neoliberalism. These include the erosion of social protections and shared responsibility of the 20th century welfare state and the growing emphasis on personal responsibility for socio-economic outcomes. From this perspective, the move towards more involved forms of parenting can be seen as a rational response by parents to a changing political-economic landscape characterized by growing economic and employment insecurity and income inequality.

To research suggests that the pattern of intensive childrearing deepened among parents in the decade following the global economic downturn of the late 2000s in response to growing uncertainty about the future of their children. During this period, intensive parenting norms have spread to low-income groups who are now as committed to the collaborative culture ideal as their middle-class peers, even if they lack the financial or cultural resources to respond. to these expectations.

We need your consent to load this content rte-playerWe use rte-player to manage additional content which may place cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please check their details and accept them to load the content.Manage preferences

From RTÉ Radio 1’s Ray D’Arcy show, child psychotherapist Colman Noctor answers listeners’ questions about parenting issues

As artificial intelligence is poised to radically transform workplaces and societies, “human-centered skills” are increasingly recognized as vital by businesses, schools and universities. These are seen as a way to offset the effects of diminishing opportunities for human interaction, to retain the advantages of humans over machines in the workplace, and to prepare them for the rapid changes of this new world. courageous. In a changing economic, occupational, and ecological landscape, parents are likely to step up concerted cultivation efforts to prevent their children from becoming downwardly mobile by “robotic-proofing” them with social-emotional skills and the psychological tools they need to navigate an increasingly demanding, uncertain and precarious future.

While parents’ child-rearing behaviors can be interpreted as a logical response to these changing conditions, numerous studies have documented the mental and physical toll these ever-increasing complexities, pressures and expectations can take on parents, as well as only for children. The stress of intensive parenting is particularly acute for mothers, especially those who combine family-earning activities with childcare obligations or who lack the economic, social, or cultural resources to meet these unattainable norms.

Society can be quick to blame bad parents for all kinds of social ills. It may be time, however, to abandon intensive parenting in favor of caregiving models that are less competitive, more sustainable, and healthier for everyone involved.


The views expressed here are those of the author and do not represent or reflect the views of RTÉ


!function (f, b, e, v, n, t, s) {
if (f.fbq) return;
n = f.fbq = function () {
n.callMethod ? n.callMethod.apply(n, arguments) : n.queue.push(arguments)
}
;
if (!f._fbq) f._fbq = n;
n.push = n;
n.loaded = !0;
n.version = ‘2.0’;
n.queue = [];
t = b.createElement(e);
t.async = !0;
t.src = v;
s = b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(t, s)
}(window, document, ‘script’, ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);

fbq(‘init’, ‘513914798814299’);

fbq(‘init’, ‘532150710329020’);

fbq(‘init’, ‘1055413517874698’);

fbq(‘track’, “PageView”);